7 Simple Ways Parents Can Cut Down on Child’s Obesity Risk

7 Simple Ways Parents Can Cut Down on Child’s Obesity Risk
  • An ongoing study is one of the first to explore how mother-infant interaction during feeding and active play influences infant and child obesity.
  • Researchers found that mothers who showed less emotional warmth during interactions with their infant had children who gained excess weight the fastest.
  • More research is needed, but experts say there are other clear steps people can take to help decrease the risk of their child’s obesity.

The harmful effects that obesity can have on children’s health are well known.

An ongoing State University of New York at Buffalo study recently published  in the journal Obesity is one of the first to explore how mother-infant interaction during feeding and active play influences infant and child obesity.

Researchers wanted to find out if parenting style could reduce the risk of obesity in children already at risk due to prenatal exposure to harmful substances. They found that that mothers who showed less emotional warmth during non-feeding-related interactions, like active play when the child was 7 months old, had children who gained excess weight the fastest.

This is one of the first studies to look at how familial interactions may affect a child’s appetite and diet.

“To our knowledge, there are no studies that examine how non-food, home environment throughout early child development can impact one’s motivation to eat, Kai Ling Kong, PhD, co-author of the study and assistant professor of pediatrics in the division of behavioral health in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo, told Healthline.

Parental style plays a role in prevention

The number of children with overweight in the United States has increased dramatically. About 10 percent of 4- and 5-year-olds have overweight. This is double the number from just 20 years ago according to New York State Department Of Health.

Children with obesity “are more likely to suffer from high blood pressure and high cholesterol; things we would normally associate with adults,” said Dr Richard Seidman, a pediatrician and chief medical officer of L.A. Care Health Plan. “These kids also have an increased risk of breathing and joint problems, not to mention the psychological and self-esteem issue.”

In order to see how parental interactions with children affected their weight, Kong and the team focused on infants whose mothers had smoked, drank, or engaged in other substance misuse, such as marijuana or cocaine, during pregnancy.

Prenatal exposure to any of these substances can subject a fetus to poor nutrition and inadequate blood or oxygen flow that may cause metabolic issues that increase the risk of childhood obesity.

Roughly 40 percent of the children in the study were classified as obese at 7 years old. This is almost double the national childhood  obesity rate of 18.5 percent.

Researchers found that mothers who showed less emotional warmth during interactions like active play when the child was an infant had children who were likely to gain excess weight the fastest.

The researchers emphasize that finding ways to promote active play might be a new and promising way to prevent obesity in high-risk infants. Helping parents learn how to interact positively with a child may help them decrease their risk for having obesity.

“A high quality of parenting or parent-child relationship is an aspect of an enriched environment, as robust evidence demonstrates the benefits of high-quality and frequent social interaction on infant cognitive development,” Kong said. “An enriched home environment provides many activities that are alternative to food, and as such, children need not find pleasure in food alone.”

beaconteam

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *